Slave Narratives of the Underground Railroad

During the 1850s and 1860s more than 100,000 people escaped slavery in the American South by following the Underground Railroad, a complex network of secret routes and safe houses. This inexpensive compilation of firsthand accounts offers authentic insights into the Civil War era and African-American history with compelling narratives by Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, and lesser-known refugees.

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Description

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Thirty selections include the story of Eliza Harris, “The Slave Woman Who Crossed the Ohio River on the Drifting Ice with Her Child in Her Arms,” whose experience inspired a memorable scene in Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Other accounts include that of Henry “Box” Brown, who hid in a crate mailed to Philadelphia abolitionists; Theophilus Collins’s escape after “A Desperate, Bloody Struggle — Gun, Knife and Fire Shovel, Used by Infuriated Master”; excerpts from Harriet Jacobs’s 1861 narrative, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; and the remarkable flight of William and Ellen Craft, “Female Slave in Male Attire, Fleeing as a Planter, with Her Husband as Her Body Servant.”

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Additional information

Publisher

Dover Publications

Language

English

Genre

Biography, History, Non-fiction

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