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A Voice from the South

$8
A cornerstone of black feminist and political theory, this collection of essays focuses on racial progress and women's rights. A Voice from the South, written in 1892, is regarded as the first statement of black feminism. Despite their imprint of nineteenth-century social thought, these essays possess an urgent, modern tone, characterized by an emphasis on debate and a scintillating wit. Topics include the importance of women's education as well as African Americans' economic roles and their literary representation.
The book advanced a vision of self-determination through education and social uplift for African American women. Its central thesis was that the educational, moral, and spiritual progress of Black women would improve the general standing of the entire African American community. Published in 1892, the book is widely viewed as one of the first articulations of Black feminism.
A noted member of Washington, D. C.'s African American community, Anna Julia Cooper (1858 - 1964) rose to prominence as a leading scholar, educator, and activist at the end of the nineteenth century. Born into slavery, she was the fourth African American woman to earn a doctoral degree, receiving a PhD in history from the University of Paris-Sorbonne in 1924. This edition includes an informative Introduction to Cooper's life and work by Janet Neary.

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About A Voice from the South

A cornerstone of black feminist and political theory, this collection of essays focuses on racial progress and women's rights. A Voice from the South, written in 1892, is regarded as the first statement of black feminism. Despite their imprint of nineteenth-century social thought, these essays possess an urgent, modern tone, characterized by an emphasis on debate and a scintillating wit. Topics include the importance of women's education as well as African Americans' economic roles and their literary representation.

The book advanced a vision of self-determination through education and social uplift for African American women. Its central thesis was that the educational, moral, and spiritual progress of Black women would improve the general standing of the entire African American community. Published in 1892, the book is widely viewed as one of the first articulations of Black feminism.

A noted member of Washington, D. C.'s African American community, Anna Julia Cooper (1858 - 1964) rose to prominence as a leading scholar, educator, and activist at the end of the nineteenth century. Born into slavery, she was the fourth African American woman to earn a doctoral degree, receiving a PhD in history from the University of Paris-Sorbonne in 1924. This edition includes an informative Introduction to Cooper's life and work by Janet Neary.

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Afrii-Diaspora Dialogue

A Platform for Dialogue for the African diaspora

A cultural and community website with a GO.A.L. to UpLift™ and EmPower™ the many different peoples, cultures, and communities of the Black and African diasporas.

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